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Pranayama meditation (Yoga) - Inner Void from Vedhan Sri

Updated: May 18, 2023

Pranayama meditation is generally safe and can be practiced by people of all ages and fitness levels. However, it is important to learn the techniques properly from a qualified instructor to ensure that they are practiced correctly and safely.


Pranayama meditation is a sort of meditation practise that is based on the principles of pranayama, which is a breathing exercise that is utilised in yoga. Pranayama meditation is a type of meditation practise that is based on the concepts of pranayama. Pranayama is a form of meditation that focuses on the practise of deep, slow breathing. These techniques are intended to help relax the mind, reduce stress, and promote general health and wellbeing.


Pranayama is a form of meditation that is almost always performed while seated, with the spine in a neutral position and the hands either resting on the knees or in the lap. The practitioner will then start by breathing through the nose and expelling through the mouth as they take a series of slow, deep breaths. It is possible that, as the practitioner grows more accustomed to the method, they will start to concentrate on particular breathing patterns, such as inhaling for a count of four, holding their breath for a count of four, and exhaling for a count of four.





Pranayama is a type of meditation that involves deep breathing methods, but it may also contain mantras, which are repeated words or phrases that assist focus the mind and generate a sense of peace, as well as visualisations, such as imagining a bright light filling the body with positive energy, or visualisations, such as imagining a brilliant light filling the body with positive energy.


According to a number of studies, the meditation technique known as pranayama can have a variety of beneficial impacts on both the mind and the body. One study revealed that it helped people feel less stressed and anxious, lowered their blood pressure and heart rate, improved the quality of their sleep, and generally improved their mood and wellbeing.


The practise of pranayama meditation does not pose any significant health risks and can be performed by individuals of any age or degree of physical fitness. However, in order to ensure that the techniques are practised in an appropriate manner without risking injury, it is necessary to learn them correctly from an experienced instructor. If you already have one or more health concerns, you should consult with a medical professional before beginning any new form of physical activity or meditative practise. This is especially vital to do before beginning any new form of exercise.


The practise of Pranayama meditation can be broken down into the following steps:


1. Find a spot where you won't be disturbed and where you can sit comfortably Choose a spot where you won't be disturbed and where you can sit comfortably without any interruptions. You have the option of sitting on a cushion or yoga mat with your legs crossed, or you can choose to sit on a chair with your feet firmly planted on the ground.


2. Ensure that your spine is aligned properly while seated: Whether you are sitting on a chair or a cushion, ensure that your spine is aligned properly. Imagine that someone is grabbing you by the hair at the top of your head and lifting you up.


3. Relax your hands and shoulders: Let your shoulders drop and rest your hands on your knees or on your lap to relax your shoulders and hands.


4. Close your eyes. When you close your eyes, you are able to block out distractions from the outside world and direct your concentration inward.


5. Start paying attention to the sensation of air moving in and out of your nose as you breathe


6. Take a few long, slow breaths in and out through your nose. Take a few long, slow breaths in and out through your nose. Take a calm and deep breath in, and then slowly and totally let out your breath.


7. Start putting your pranayama breathing techniques into practise. You can practise a variety of pranayama breathing techniques. The following are some examples:


To perform Nadi Shodhana, also known as "Alternate Nostril Breathing," block your right nostril with your right hand, then inhale deeply through your left nostril. After that, switch hands and block your left nostril, and exhale through your right. Continue in this manner for several rounds.



The Ujjayi Breathing, also known as the Ocean Breath, involves taking a long, deep breath in via your nose, followed by an exhalation through your mouth while slightly contracting the muscles at the back of your throat to imitate the sound of crashing waves. Continue in this manner for several rounds.
Kapalabhati, also known as "Skull-Shining Breath," requires that you sit in a comfortable position with your hands resting on your knees. Take a long, slow breath in through your mouth, then firmly exhale through your nose as you tense the muscles in your abdominal region. Continue in this manner for several rounds.

8. Include Visualisations or Mantras in Your Pranayama Meditation Practise If you choose to, you can incorporate mantras or visualisations into your Pranayama meditation practise. You may, for instance, imagine a bright light filling your body with positive energy or repeat a calming mantra such as "Om" or "I am calm and peaceful." Both of these techniques are effective in reducing stress.


9. Bring your practise to a close: When you are ready to bring your practise of pranayama and meditation to a close, take a few long, deep breaths, and then open your eyes very gently. Take a few moments to calm down and focus on how you are sensation.


Keep in mind that it is essential to acquire the appropriate methods from an experienced instructor in order to ensure that you are engaging in productive and risk-free practise. Pranayama meditation has the potential to make you feel more calm, centred, and at ease when practised on a daily basis.


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